How to fix ‘Can’t Open File’ error on Chrome for Android

Do you want to install FrostWire Plus on your Android and you’re getting the error:
“Can’t Open File”?

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We’ve made this video to show you how to fix the ‘Can’t Open File’ error on Google Chrome when downloading .apk files on Android.

This tutorial works not just for the FrostWire installer but for any app installer (.apk file) you may have had to download from a website, and it works for every Android phone or tablet.

There’s no reason why Google Chrome should be blocking the installation of .apk’s with their browser which happens to be the default of most phones out there, any app can handle opening .apk files, Google has simply decided to have more control of the android ecosystem and is trying to force everyone to use their Google Play market.

If things keep going this way, Google will be able to censor app developers completely if apps don’t follow their whimsical market rules, eventually they’ll turn Android into an iOS like environment where you can’t simply install apps without using the official store, the biggest bait and switch in the history of personal computing. Google, don’t be evil.

Do you like this video? Subscribe FrostWire on YouTube and watch all our how to videos.

Is FrostWire Safe?

FrostWire – free at http://www.frostwire.com – is a file sharing
application and media hub.

FrostWire, as a stand-alone application, is 100% safe to use. FrostWire
itself will not install any viruses, adware, malware or spyware. But is
there a way you can get your computer in trouble while using FrostWire?
Sure.

FrostWire connects to other computers & online servers to find the
content you are looking for. FrostWire does not itself create, host or
control the content it finds on the internet – the same way internet
browsers do not create, host, or control the websites & files you view
and download through them. There are some safeguards in place to
recognize and prevent malicious content from showing up in the search
results, but none are perfect. Before you download a file:

1) Check if the file size makes sense for the content type you wish
to download
2) Check the Source link to see file comments other
users have left on the hosting website and most importantly, if you
are a Windows user and do anything online, always
3) Make sure you have an up-to-date anti-virus software installed
and you check any file you download before opening it.

Music Credit: “The Big House” by Jason Shaw

http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jason_Shaw/
Audionautix_Tech_Urban_Dance/TU-TheBigHouse

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

OSX Mavericks users, How to Prevent App Nap on FrostWire

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Go to Applications (or wherever you have installed FrostWire)

Right click on the the FrostWire Icon > Get Info (or just Press Cmd+I after you’ve selected)

Make sure FrostWire won’t nap when it’s in the background.

Otherwise, you may start a long running transfer and OSX Mavericks will put FrostWire to sleep and your transfer won’t finish.

This is only a temporary work around to this new issue introduced by Mavericks and its awesome power saving tactics, we’re working on an update so that you don’t have to do this in the future.

How to help translate FrostWire for Desktop (Windows / Mac / Linux)

Help us translate the FrostWire user interface, be part of an open source project, learn new things.

0. Get a GitHub.com account and sign in
Go to GitHub.com and sign up for a free account unless you have one already.

1. Download and install Git on your computer
If you don’t have git installed on your computer, here are instructions on how to install.

git, is a version control software which helps us keep track of all the changes on every file that belong to the FrostWire project.
GitHub.com is a site where we host our source code and its origin git repository (the official one), think of the repository as a database to keep all those file versions.

GitHub is really helpful because it makes colaboration very social, we can comment and review each other’s changes before merging them into the origin repository.

2. Fork us on github.
Go to https://github.com/frostwire/frostwire-desktop/, this is the page for our origin repo. Forking means you will be making a copy of your own inside your github account. You will wok on that one, and when you are done you will send the changes to the origin repo.

For us by clicking on the button that says “Fork” on the top right.

Once the fork is done, you can go to your github personal page, and in the list of your repositories you should have your frostwire-desktop fork.

As of now, that copy lives only at github.com, you could try and edit the files up there, but it’s very uncomfortable working that way, the text editor can be quite slow sometimes, so …

3. Clone your forked repo to your computer
Go to a command line, or with your favorite git client make a clone of YOUR repo (not ours).
If you use the command line git client, you should issue the following command

git clone https://github.com/myusername/frostwire-desktop

wait a few seconds and all the source code and assets that belong to the frostwire-desktop project will be downloaded to a folder called “frostwire-desktop” on your computer.

change directory to it…
cd frostwire-desktop

4. Create a branch for your translation
Create a branch with a name that will help us understand that this is a translation update you’re sending us, it could be named something like
“translation-french-2013-november-myname”, so that we can easily see what language you are translating, on which date you were working on it, and your name so we can give you credit for it.

You create a branch on the git command line like this (just remember to put the name of YOUR branch instead)

Create a branch locally
git branch translation-french-2013-november-myname

Push it to your remote repository
git push origin -u translation-french-2013-november-myname

now your branch lives both on your computer and at your github repository.

Switch to that branch
git checkout translation-french-2013-november-myname

Now you’re ready to start working on your branch.

After we’ve accepted your changes, next time you want to help us do another update of the translation you will have to create a new branch.

5. Make sure the latest english strings have been put into your language.po file
enter the following command to sync strings

ant gettext-extract

(this could take a while to finish as it goes through every line of code looking for translatable strings.)

6. Translate, translate, translate
Now you get to do the actual translation. Translation files are in the following folder inside the frostwire-desktop project
cd lib/messagebundles

If you’re going to translate say to arabic, you will edit the ar.po file, it should be easy to find the language file for the language you intend to work on. We recommend that you use a PO Editor software to make things easier, and always make sure to save the file using UTF-8 encoding.

7. Test your translation
To test your translation, you will need to recreate the message bundle file, for this you will need to invoke the following command

ant gettext-bundle

assuming you didn’t mess up anything in the format of the .po file this should finish after a few minutes of bundling every language file.
If you see any errors you should try to fix them, if you don’t know how to fix them you can reach us on the FrostWire forum, or right here for help.

once the bundle is built, you need to test your translation, for this you will need to build FrostWire, you can do this in one step, from the root frostwire-desktop folder type:

ant

after a couple minutes it should be done compiling everything, and then you can invoke the “run” script right there if you’re on Linux or Mac, if you’re on windows, go to gui/ and invoke the run.bat file.

FrostWire will open, switch to your language and make sure your translations are fine.

8. Time to commit and push your changes

Once you are finished, commit your changes, make sure you don’t make changes in other files than the .po of the language you are working with.
So if you’re working say with italian, you would do (from the frostwire-desktop root directory)

git commit lib/messagebundles/it.po -m "my translation update for italian users"

and then push it to your fork up on github

git push

9. Submit a pull request

Once you see your last commit on github and you are sure you’re finished, it’s time to let us know, so you will submit what’s called a “Pull Request”.
If there are any special notes please let us know, we’ll review your changes, and if everything is good to go, we’ll merge them, and you will make open source history 🙂

HACK: How to change the location of your FrostWire settings folder

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This post is for advanced users who might not be happy with the default location of the FrostWire configuration folder (as of this generation of frostwire it’s called “.frostwire5” and it resides somewhere on your home folder since FrostWire will create it the first time it runs)

Maybe you don’t like folders on your home folder, maybe you keep all your configuration folders elsewhere, maybe you want to install FrostWire and keep it running on a external drive or USB stick, we’ve coded this just for you.

the “.meta” file

You will need to create a new file called “.meta” and place it next to your FrostWire executable wherever it may be.

For Windows users, this has to be on the same folder as in FrostWire.exe exists.

For Mac users, this will be inside “FrostWire.app/Contents/MacOS/” wherever your FrostWire.app may be.

For Linux users, this will be wherever your frostwire.sh and frostwire.jar files may be, in Ubuntu the default location is /usr/share/frostwire

Here’s an example of how that might look for an external drive:


#FrostWire .meta configuration file example (works only after FrostWire 5.6.3)
#meta settings for windows
user.settings.dir.windows=e:\configurations\.frostwire5.windows
user.settings.root_folder.windows=e:\Downloads

#meta settings for mac osx
user.settings.dir.mac=/Volumes/MyExternalDriveName/configurations/.frostwire5.mac
user.settings.root_folder.mac=/Volumes/MyExternalDriveName/Downloads

#meta settings for linux/unix
user.settings.dir.posix=/media/MyExternalDriveName/configurations/.frostwire5.posix
user.settings.root_folder.posix=/media/MyExternalDriveName/Downloads


NOTICE 1: Notice how we’ve created different setting folder locations for each operating system. If you want to avoid conflicts and “Data file missing” errors with your ongoing downloads, you might want to keep separate configurations for different operating systems (if you’re running frostwire off a removable disk for example).
Update (Sep 22th 2013) After FrostWire 5.6.5 you will be able to share the same settings directory for all operating systems, no more issues of “Data file missing”. Also we recommend that in the case of user.settings.dir.windows you use a relative file path, since mounting the USB drive on different computers might result in file paths starting with different letters, e.g. e:\, f:\, g:\…

NOTICE 2: You might want to keep a copy of your “.meta” file elsewhere, next time your FrostWire is updated it will certainly delete everything inside the folder containing binaries. All your configuration files (except .meta) and downloaded files will remain untouched (as always) after any updates.

NOTICE 3: No need to create configuration pair for operating systems you won’t use FrostWire on.

If you’re running FrostWire on an external drive we recommend that you point your “root_folder” (the place where all main default download folders go to) to be the same across different OSes, so that you can finish downloads that you may have started on a computer with say Windows (at work), on another that runs MacOSX (home), you will just have to restart the torrent, but since the data files will be on the expected location, it’ll pick up right where it left (we find this awesome)

configuration keys
(Where <osname> can be any of ‘windows’,’mac’,’posix’.)

user.settings.dir.<osname> the location where FrostWire will look for/create a settings folder which keeps track of all preferences and ongoing transfers.

user.settings.root_folder.<osname> the location of the default root downloads folder. Here FrostWire will create a “Downloads”, “From Device” and “Torrents” folders. The “Downloads” is the default save location, but you can change it in the BitTorrent settings later. “From Device” is where all files downloaded via Wi-Fi sharing will go, and “Torrents”, is where FrostWire will keep the .torrent files of transfers you start out of Bittorrent search results.

File paths can be either relative or absolute.

If you have any questions please leave a comment.
Cheers